Authors

Nancy L. Rose

Head of the Department of Economics and Charles P. Kindleberger Professor of Applied Economics

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Nancy L. Rose is the Head of the Department of Economics and Charles P. Kindleberger Professor of Applied Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where her teaching and research focus on industrial organization, competition policy, and the economics of regulation. She served as Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Economic Analysis in the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice from 2014 – 2016, and directed the National Bureau of Economic Research program in Industrial Organization from its creation in 1991 until her appointment to the Department of Justice. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a Distinguished Fellow of the Industrial Organization Society. Her research includes analyses of economic regulation and firm behavior, labor rent-sharing and determinants of executive pay, and merger policy. Professor Rose received her Ph.D. in Economics from MIT and an A.B. in Economics and Government from Harvard University. Her accomplishments have been recognized by numerous fellowships over her career, including those from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Hoover Institution, John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and National Science Foundation. Her professional service includes membership on the American Antitrust Institute Advisory Board, terms as Vice President and Executive Committee member of the American Economic Association (AEA), and independent directorships on both public and nonprofit boards.

Publications

Concerns About Concentration

Overview: A number of studies in recent years have fueled policymakers’ concerns over rising market concentration and the state of competition in US industry. However, determining the relationship between market concentration and other key economic outcomes­—such as markups, profit rates, labor share, and the state of competition more broadly—is fraught with empirical challenges. The state […]